The St Andrews Prize for the Environment

University of St Andrews

ConocoPhillips

22 March 2016

Reaching Beyond Barriers to Restore Nature and Hope

Reaching Beyond Barriers to Restore Nature and Hope

Dr. Axel Moehrenschlager to deliver Public Lecture entitled "Reaching Beyond Barriers to Restore Nature and Hope" at this year’s St Andrews Prize seminar.

Dr Alex Moehrenschlager In this talk, Dr Axel Moehrenschlager, Director of Conservation & Science at Calgary Zoological Society, will examine the impact of rising human populations and the unprecedented pressures on nature as well as humanity itself. He will discuss how the science and practice of conservation has been developing to combat these issues. He will look at whether our response is enough and how we can attract the support needed to confront these global challenges for the good of nature and humanity.

Dr. Axel Moehrenschlager has conducted research and training to develop science-based solutions for effective conservation for over 25 years. He has a Ph.D. from Oxford University, is an Erskine Fellow at New Zealand’s University of Canterbury and an Adjunct Associate Professor at Canada’s University of Calgary.


Information:

Public Lecture
Wednesday, 20 April 2016, 6-7pm

MEDICAL & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES LECTURE THEATRE, NORTH HAUGH, ST ANDREWS
FREE ENTRY  NO PREREGISTRATION REQUIRED


Lecture Background:

Consistent increases in human populations are putting unprecedented pressures on nature.  The consequences are not uniform, as some species are more vulnerable than others and many are trapped within life histories that restrict their ability to adapt or disperse. 

Nature’s deterioration in turn places unprecedented pressures upon humanity, and again the consequences are inequitable.  Some societies are more vulnerable than others while many are trapped within constraints that restrict their ability to adapt or disperse. 

The science and practice of conservation has been developing rapidly as threats become better understood, mitigations are proposed, and temporary responses emerge.  Such solutions generally slow nature’s deterioration; but is this enough?  Indeed, is the entire concept of conservation in question when battles are won but the global war is being lost?  We must come to see that ecology and economy are not isolated, that nature’s loss is also a loss to the individual, to business, and to governments. 

The ubiquitous nature and effects of environmental challenges could unify ideological boundaries like no other issues facing humanity.  Future wins are not just to be made within the environmental field, but beyond it. 


For further information or if you have any queries regarding the lecture please contact the St Andrews Prize office, prize@st-andrews.ac.uk, Tel: 01334 462161.